How to change column width in Google Sheets

Google Sheets can do the same thing in multiple ways. For instance, you may want to change the width of a column. This could be for a number of reasons such as trying to fit in all the relevant information within a column.

Changing the column width is fairly easy on Google sheets. However, there is more than one way to do it. The method to choose depends on your requirements. In this guide, we break down everything you need to know about changing column width on Google Sheets. 

3 Methods of Altering Column Width: 

  • Manually Widen or Narrow Column Width 
  • Automatically Widen Column Width   
  • Changing the Width of Several Columns Together 

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How to apply a formula to entire column in Google Sheets

Google sheets allow you to create spreadsheets that can store various types of data. You can use the stored data to perform complex calculations and create visualizations. 

To perform complex calculations, we use formulas. Usually, you would want to apply the formula to more than one row. If there are a lot of rows, it can be a cumbersome process.

This article will give you an insight into the different ways you can apply a formula to an entire column.

5 methods to apply a formula to an entire column

  • Using the Autofill suggestion
  • By dragging the cell’s handle
  • Using the shortcut Ctrl + D
  • Using Ctrl + Shift + Down Arrow”
  • Using Array Formula

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How to rename a column in Google Sheets

Google sheets allow you to create spreadsheets that can store various types of data. You can use the stored data to perform complex calculations and create visualizations. It can be tiresome to select the range of cells every time you apply a function or perform a calculation. 

Renaming columns enables you to use your column name instead of the range of cells. This eases your work and saves you time. Sometimes, the header is also included by mistake while performing calculations. 

You can avoid this by separating the column names from the rest of the data. Freezing the header or renaming your column will help you achieve this. Also, note that you cannot rename the first row, i.e., the fixed header set by Google Sheets.

3 methods to rename a column in Google Sheets

  • Using the name box
  • Using named ranges
  • Using the Freeze option

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How to sum a column in Google Sheets

Google sheet allows you to use many functions on a data set. Functions are convenient mathematical operations that can convert raw data into usable information. One such function is the SUM function, which lets you sum up numeric data in a column.

Formula for the SUM Function

The SUM Function totals the values of specific cells, a particular row or column. To use the SUM function, you may use the following formula:

= SUM(A1: A5): Sums cells A1 through A5

OR

=SUM(A1, A5): Sums cells A1 and A5

Here are a few things you should remember while using the SUM function:

1. The word SUM denotes the function name. The bracket () encapsulates the cells in a row or a column that contain the numeric data.

2. The cell reference before the ‘:’ denotes the cell from which the summation begins.

3. ‘:’ allows you to input a range of adjacent cells, and ‘,’ allows you to input non-consecutive cells.  

4. The cell after the semicolon denotes the cell where the summation ends.

3 ways to sum a column in Google Sheets

  • Method 1: Manually type the formula in the cell
  • Method 2: Using the Insert Function Option
  • Method 3: SUM a Column on a Cellular Device

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How to Highlight Text in Google Sheets

Google Sheets allows you to create spreadsheets. In spreadsheets, you can store different types of data, including words, numbers and currencies. 

You might only want to highlight a portion of the text in a particular cell. For example, in the image below, the word ‘Urgent’ is highlighted in red. This allows you to emphasize the text. You can also change the formatting of the text in other ways. For instance, you can italicize it or make it bold. The one thing you cannot do is change the background color of only a portion of the text. You will have to change the background color of the entire cell.

You can also highlight text by changing the background color of the cells containing any text. Doing this allows you to distinguish between cells that are empty and cells that have text. Google Sheets allows you to do this as well. 

3 methods of highlighting text in Google Sheets:

  • Using the text box at the top to highlight portions of a text
  • Double-clicking on a cell to highlight portions of a text
  • Using conditional formatting to highlight only cells with text 

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How to remove duplicates in Google Sheets

Working with spreadsheets, especially with large sets of data, can sometimes be confusing. 

When you already spent a lot of screen time encoding on your worksheets, there is a possibility that you have encoded duplicate entries. Of course, you can always go over your worksheets and check all your entries to correct them, but this can be a bothersome task. 

Google Sheets offers some methods you can use to solve this problem. You can either use the Remove duplicates command or the UNIQUE function.

Familiarize yourself about these methods by finishing this article.

  1. An example of a worksheet that contains unique records

Now, there are two methods you can use to remove duplicates in Google Sheets.

2 Ways to Remove Duplicates in Google Sheets

  • Removing duplicates using the Remove duplicates command
  • Removing duplicates using the UNIQUE function

Before you proceed with the steps, it is important to understand when to use each method. You can use each of these methods in certain situations. Use the Remove duplicates command if you intend to remove all duplicate entries in a cell range. Suppose you need to identify the unique records in a cell range without removing the original records, you can use the UNIQUE function. As you read this article, you will learn some of the practical applications of these methods.

Let’s get started!

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How to Set Print Area in Google Sheets

Google Sheets can have up to 5 million cells. It’s definitely overwhelming, but it can accommodate all the numbers you want to crunch and the formulas you want to use. Now, what if you need to prepare and print a report with the data and some calculations? 

Spreadsheets are not only for data analysis. More often than not, you will need to present the data together with some charts and graphs in printed form.

And, in most cases, making it as legible as possible might be a challenging task. The good news is Google Sheets provides simple ways to set your print area easily. 

Now, if you’ve been used to how MS Excel sets print areas, you might find how Google Sheets handles it a little different.

Google Sheets does not have the same feature as Excel to set a print area while you’re working on your spreadsheet.

You will only find print area options once you open Google Sheets’ Print settings window. 

You’ve come to the right place because we’ve got you covered. Here, we’ve carefully laid out here in this guide below the steps to easily set the print area of your spreadsheet.

Now, there are about two ways to set the print area in Google Sheets. 

2 Ways to Set Print Area in Google Sheets

  • Setting Selected Cells as Print Area
  • Setting The Current Sheet or Workbook as Print Area

Both these methods will be covered in this guide down below. At the same time, we also made sure to include some customization tips to make your print area more readable when printed. 

Hopefully, you’ll find the steps outlined here relatively easy to follow, as we have created this tutorial with beginners in mind. Also, we will expound on each of the methods bit by bit to help you follow us at every step of the way. 

Without any delay, let’s get on with it! 

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How to freeze rows in google sheets

If you didn’t know, Google Sheets can have more than 15,000 rows. While that might be hard to imagine, it’s even harder to keep track of your column heads while you’re scrolling up and down. In most cases, you’ll find it difficult to compare data even between columns as you scroll down. This is also true when comparing data between rows. 

Now, there are two ways to freeze rows in Google Sheets. 

2 Ways to Freeze Rows in Google Sheets

  • Freeze the first row 
  • Freeze a certain number of rows up to the current row

Both of these methods will be covered in this guide down below. At the same time, we made sure to include a guide on how to freeze and unfreeze columns in Google Sheets. You’ll find those two sections at the end of the article, so make sure to scroll all the way through!

Now, the first method allows you to freeze a number of rows that are pre-defined by Google Sheets. The second one gives you more freedom in terms of how many rows you can freeze. However, there are some limitations to this, and we’ll go over these restrictions below. Hopefully, you’ll find the steps in this guide relatively easy to follow, as we have laid them out with beginners in mind. 

Without further ado, let’s get on with it!

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How to color alternate rows in Google Sheets

Looking at numbers and texts in a plain spreadsheet table can be an unpleasant experience.

Coloring alternate rows of your spreadsheet not only makes it look easy on the eyes but, most especially, more professional.

Shading alternate rows also make navigating through dozens of them a breeze.

Now, there are two ways to color alternate rows in Google Sheets. 

2 Ways to Color Alternate Rows in Google Sheets

  • Using the built-in function of Google Sheets
  • Using a formula in the conditional formatting 

The first method is the simplest way to color alternate rows. However, it is limited only to coloring every other row. Thus, you may find the second one more flexible, especially if you want to control the number of rows to be shaded. 

To help you even further, we included links to the same exact spreadsheet we used in this guide down below. You may choose to use our sample spreadsheet so you could start following the steps right away. 

Alternatively, you can also apply what you learned in this article to your own personal spreadsheet.  

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